Topic outline

  • Climate Action Resources: General

    These resources are more general and related to the Climate Action Framework as a whole.


    Resources

    Climate Action Framework for the Australian International Development SectorDownloads a Word document
    This Climate Action Framework has been developed to support Australian international development NGOs increase their engagement and action on climate change.
    Climate Action Framework for the Australian International Development Sector - SummaryDownloads a Word document
    This Climate Action Framework has been developed to support Australian international development NGOs increase their engagement and action on climate change.
    Introduction to Climate Change and DevelopmentDownloads a Word document
    This module on Learn with ACFID will help develop your understanding of definitions for key climate change terms; emissions and the urgency for action addressing climate change; the relationship between vulnerability, power imbalance and gender inequity; and, impacts of climate change for humanitarian and development work.
    Integrating climate action into CSO programming: A "How To Guide"Downloads a Word document
    This document provides guidance to NGOs and CSOs on how to take first steps to integrate climate action into their organisations and programs. The audience is primarily organisations who do not have a direct link to climate change through their programs, thus may find it challenging to consider how climate change is relevant to them.
    Integrating climate change action across the Australian international development sector: Enablers of Best PracticeDownloads a Word document
    This report provides grounded and practical examples of best practice for climate change integration. Case studies are linked to different aspects of ACFID’s Climate Action Framework to demonstrate the various approaches some organisations have taken to integrate climate action into policy, programs and practice.
    Integrating climate change action across the Australian international development sector: Setting te scene for ANGOsDownloads a Word document
    This document is aimed at ACFID members, and it describes the system in which Australian NGOs (ANGOs) operate for integrating climate change considerations in their development programming. This document also provides a background of the types of climate change programming ANGOs undertake, and their local engagement approaches in-country – and provides links to the ACFID Climate Action Framework (described in Section 1.2) where possible.
    Climate Change and disaster resilience - integration for transformation

    Climate Literacy: Navigating Climate Change ConversationsDownloads a Word document
    This series is a collectionof lecture videos from the free UBC course Climate Literacy: Navigating Climate Change Conversations, which tackles the scientific and socio-political dimensions of climate change. This course introduces the basics of the climate system, models and predictions, human and natural impacts, mitigative and adaptive responses, and the evolution of climate policy.
    Understanding Climate ChangeDownloads a Word document
    Key information about climate change - what it is, its effects on communities and actions to solve the crisis.
    Resilience HandbookDownloads a Word document
    This handbook aims to support the effectiveness of work with communities by providing guidance, tools and resources to support resilience building in programming. It provides readers with a framework for resilience that can be applied in different programme environments, and includes principles of effective programming
    weADAPTDownloads a Word document
    weADAPT is a global, collaborative community of research, policy and practice on climate change adaptation issues. Find the latest knowledge, share your work and connect with others working on similar issues.
    Care Climate and Resilience Academy: Climate Justice and Gender JusticeDownloads a Word document
    In these courses on climate justice and gender justice, you will get a better understanding of how climate justice and gender justice are linked and what is needed to implement gender-transformative and gender-responsive interventions.
    10 Things to know: Gender equality and achieving climate goalsDownloads a Word document
    This guide highlights the advantages and challenges of pursuing climate compatible development from a gender perspective.
    Gender and Climate Change Training HandbookDownloads a Word document
    This handbook aims to improve the understanding of gender aspects in climate change. It is intended for experts and interested public, and is organized as a training program for male and female representatives of institutions and state administration, so that it may can be used as a source for practical training, as well as a guide for the introduction of gender perspective in programs and projects. The manual is organized according to thematic units of training and includes basic concepts, gender roles and stereotypes; key gender aspects of climate change; legal and strategic frameworks; and the introduction of gender perspectives in policies and programs in the field of climate change.
    Making It Count. Integrating Gender into Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction: A Practical How-to GuideDownloads a Word document
    This guide has been developed for project staff, Government and non-Government partners to use during design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of climate change and disaster risk reduction activities. It gives suggestions on how to practically address gender and women’s empowerment in climate change and DRR projects, or projects which have integrated climate change and DRR considerations.
    The intersection of sexual and reproductive health and rights and the climate crisis
    This panel session from ACFID Conference 2022 explores the social, economic and health implications of the climate crisis for women and young girls, with a focus on the Asia Pacific Region.
    Come Heat or High Water: Tackling the humanitarian impacts of the climate crisis together
    In this Webinar watch the launch of this flagship Red Cross report entitled "Come heat or high water: tackling the humanitarian impacts of the climate crisis together", which focusses on understanding the humanitarian impacts of climate change.
    Children in a Changing ClimateDownloads a Word document
    Established in 2007, Children in a Changing Climate (CCC) advocates for and promotes the rights of children in climate change and disaster risk reduction policy and practice.
    Environment and Climate Action: Investing in Sustainable Outcomes for Children
    This report presents the results of that review, describing the different areas of work and highlighting examples of environment and climate action in our field programmes. The authors have identified promising practices and make recommendations that are relevant for agencies working towards a climate-safe future for children.
    Gender Equality, Women's Voice and ResilienceDownloads a Word document

    The purpose of this guidance note is to provide CARE and partner staff with direction for integrating gender equality and women’s voice into their resilience-related work, by explaining:

    - The importance of GEWV in resilience-related work;

    - Strategies for enhancing resilience through GEWV;

    - Key gender actions to consider in resilience-related projects;

    - Practical examples of gender considerations in resilience-related projects; and

    - Different tools and resources to support GEWV and resilience within projects.

    Using Community-Centred Approaches to Build Resilience to ScaleDownloads a Word document
    This Evidence Brief synthesises evidence of how Oxfam is working to support community-centred approaches to climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction, delivering outcomes for people who are at risk from disasters and climate change
    Animation series on sector based climate impacts
    The animation series comprises five episodes focusing on climate change awareness and resilient development activities, each linked to specific sectors: health, infrastructure, and GESI
    Pacific Resilience Standards: A Practitioner's Guide
    The document includes broad principles for resilience building.  These Guiding Principles are central to the Pacific Resilience Standards (PRS), which have been developed to support implementation of the FRDP and to ensure that resilience building in the region is Integrated, Inclusive, Informed and Sustained.
    Pacific gender and climate change toolkit
    The Pacific Gender and Climate Change toolkit is designed to support climate change practitioners in the Pacific islands region to integrate gender into their programmes and projects.

    Return to Main Menu


  • Organisational Climate Risk

    Organisational climate risk is an adaptation response at the operational level. The objective of organisational climate risk actions is to mitigate climate change risks to an organisation's programs, operations, assets, and staff.


    Principles

    Actions to reduce an organisation's climate risk should be evidence-based. They should be informed by robust climate assessments, and they should be informed by credible local climate change data or projects.

    Actions to reduce an organisation's climate risk should be equitable. They should consider how climate risks may impact differently on staff and how risk management measures can account for these.

    Actions to reduce an organisation's climate risk should be inclusive. They should involve local staff, community members and leaders to support the identification of local climate risks.

    Actions

    Actions that organisations can take to start identifying and planning for climate change risks to programs and operations include:

    • Including climate change risks in the organisation's strategic and operational risk register.
    • Ensuring that country strategies, security and contingency plans include an analysis of potential short to medium term climate change impacts on operations, programs, assets, and staff.
    • Identifying and disseminating credible climate projections, as downscaled as possible, for all operational and program areas to relevant managers and staff.
    • Ensuring the design of all new projects considers the projected climate change impacts for the targeted areas and assesses the potential impact of these changes on project outcomes and sustainability.

    Resources

    Climate Change: Questions for your Governing BodyDownloads a Word document
    Questions developed by ACFID to help your governing body to work out where they stand on discharging their duties concerning climate change, and what else they may need to do.
    Climate risk governance guide in new tab
    Guidance by the Australian Institute of Company Directors (AICD) to assist directors address climate change governance. The guide provides a plain-language introduction and practical steps.
    Climate Governance for NFP Directors: Starting the Journey to Net Zero in new tab
    This Guide includes specific examples and practical resources for how directors of NFPs can take action to address climate change, such as reducing energy consumption or transitioning to renewable energy sources. It also provides an overview of the importance of engagement with stakeholders and highlights the risks and opportunities of addressing climate change.
    Climate Change and organisational strategy: Developing strategy for a changing environment from the perspective of the board
     in new tabThis document explores how to integrate climate change into your organisation's strategy and consider ways to create commercial value in an economy transitioning to net zero.
    Connecting Climate Change and Strategy
     in new tabThis webinar covers embedding climate opportunity and risk into strategic thinking; how to undertake climate change scnario planning; building capacity in the board and executive team; key questions directors should be asking themselves; and, insights from directors working at the cutting edge.

    Return to Main Menu


  • Reducing Environmental Impact

    Reducing environmental impact is an environmental restoration response at the operational level. The objective of reducing environmental impact is to reduce the environmental impact of an organisation’s operations and programs.


    Principles

    Actions to reduce environmental impact should be evidence-based.

    Actions to reduce environmental impact should be equitable.

    Actions to reduce environmental impact should be inclusive.

    Actions

    Actions that organisations can take to reduce the environmental impact of operations and programs include:

    • Analysing environmental risks and opportunities.
    • Conducting environmental impact assessments.
    • Implementing a design appraisal tool or set of criteria requiring an assessment of environmental risk.
    • Periodic reporting on environmental impact reductions.

    Resources

    DFAT Good Practice Note: Assess and manage environmental risks and impacts
    DFAT's guidance on how to screen, assess, and manage environmental risks when planning and implementing an investment.
    DFAT's Environmental and Social Safeguarding Policy
    DFAT's Policy for Environmental and Social Safeguards
    DFAT's Environmental and Social Safeguard Operational Procedures
    The Environmental and Social Safeguard Operational Procedures (operational procedures) guides how to implement DFAT’s Environmental and Social Safeguard Policy (safeguard policy) at each step of the aid management cycle described in the Aid Programming Guide (APG). The operational procedures provide advice on how to manage safeguards when working with partner organisations and where to get more safeguard guidance and tools.
    DFAT's Social and Environmental Safeguarding Screening Tool
    DFAT's tool for screening and managing risks related to environmental impact (as well as other social risks)
    Climate, Environment and Disaster Risk Reduction Integration Guidance (CEDRIG)
    This portal has tools which can assess if existing and planned strategies, programs and projects are at risk from climate change, environmental degradation and natural hazards, as well as whether these interventions could further exacerbate GHG emissions, environmental degradation or risks of natural hazards. includes tools for rapid assessment, analysis of strategies and programs and detailed analysis of projects.

    Return to Main Menu


  • Decarbonising Programs and Operations

    Decarbonising programs and operations is a mitigation response at the operational level. The objective of decarbonising programs and operations is to reduce the impact of an organisation’s own operations and programs.


    Principles

    Actions to reduce an organisation’s carbon emissions should be evidence-based. They should be informed by a publicly available organisational emissions inventory. They should be based on actions that are proven to reduce emissions, and they should be implemented at a speed and sale that aligns with climate science and global efforts to keep warming to as close to 1.5°C as possible.

    Actions to reduce an organisation’s carbon emissions should be equitable. They should ensure that responsibility for reducing emissions is shared across organisational operational areas, and ensure that the work is funded and does not fall only on staff with operations responsibilities.

    Actions to reduce an organisation’s carbon emissions should be inclusive. They should involve staff in Australia and overseas to support the identification and implementation of emission reduction opportunities.

    Actions

    Steps that organisations can take to reduce emissions include:

    • Developing a greenhouse gas inventory for the organisation and establishing an emissions baseline.
    • Committing to organisational emissions reduction targets that are in line with (or better than) the required rate of global emissions reduction.
    • Developing an action plan to reduce emissions in line with targets.
    • Auditing emissions inventory annually to monitor and track emission reductions.
    • Divesting from banks and other financial institutions that continue to fund fossil fuels.
    • Promoting ethical superannuation funds that do not invest in fossil fuels.
    • Reducing the number of domestic and international flights taken by the organisation.
    • Installing rooftop solar panels at offices or purchasing 100 per cent green certified energy.
    • Replacing gas heating or appliances with electric alternatives.
    • Offsetting unavoidable emissions.

    Resources

    Short course - Becoming a Climate-Smart Organisation
    The aim of this online course is twofold. Firstly, you will learn why Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) must reduce their own emissions and secondly, we provide you with useful tools and tips for how to reduce emissions in the office.
    Decarbonising Australian Volunteers International
    This case study demonstrates AVI's approaches to decarbonise its programs and operations and provides lessons for other organisations looking to integrate low-carbon actions.
    Blog: The sustainability initiative so effective it ended
    The story of the WWF-Australia Sustainability Committee and its work reducing the carbon footprint of internal operations.
    Business Carbon Calculator
    Calculate your organisation's emissions
    What's the aid sector's carbon footprint

    The Climate and Environment Charter for Humanitarian Organisations
    This charter developed by the ICRD and IFRC is for organisations committed to reducing the imact of crises by accelerating their own action and mobilising others. Many organisations that have signed on to the charter, also have listed documentation of their targets, action plans and public commitments.
    The Humanitarian Carbon Calculator
    The Humanitarian Carbon Calculator allows organizations to assess the direct and indirect  greenhouse gas emissions associated with their activities. This in turn makes it possible to set reduction targets and to build emission reduction plans. The Humanitarian Carbon Calculator can also be used to monitor the evolution of an organization’s emissions over time, thereby assessing the effectiveness of efforts to reduce emissions.
    Green Office Checklist
    University New South Wales' Green Office Checklist to assess how sustainable your workspace is, and identify actions to improve.
    Environmental impact in procurement - goods and services procurement guide
    Tools and Guidance from Victoria's Enviornmental Protection Agency on lowering your organisation's environmental impact. Includes Environmental Improvement Plans, Carbon Management Plans, Improving resource efficiency
    Sustainability Action Planning
    Australian Government's guidance for businesses to develop a sustainability action plan, including a link to a sustainability action plan template.
    Green Office Climate Calculator
    Measure the carbon footprint of your workplace with the climate calculator.

    Return to Main Menu


  • Building Climate Resilience

    Building climate resilience is an adaptation response at the programmatic level. The objective of actions to build climate resilience is to build the resilience of communities to anticipate, adjust, prepare, and respond to changed climate conditions.


    Principles

    Actions to build climate resilience should be evidence-based. They should be informed by credible climate change data and projections; and they should be informed by risk and vulnerability assessments that consider the differentiated risks and vulnerabilities of different groups.

    Actions to build climate resilience should be equitable. They should seek to understand the differentiated impacts of climate change on different groups; seek to identify and respond to issues of inequality, exclusion and power; and promote and uphold human rights.

    Actions to build climate resilience should be inclusive. They should engage local communities and be locally-led, including the identification, design, implementation and monitoring and evaluation of actions.

    Actions

    Actions that organisations can take to help build resilience include:

    • Conducting climate risk and vulnerability assessments.
    • Increasing access to early warning systems and development of early actions.
    • Improving preparedness with contingency plans and emergency responses.
    • Establishing effective governance to manage climate risks, accompanied by human and institutional capacity-building.
    • Utilising nature-based solutions to reduce risks.
    • Climate proofing of infrastructure and services.
    • Increasing access to insurance and social protection instruments.
    • Sharing knowledge and best practice on climate risk management.
    • Increasing the volume, quality and access of public and private finance to invest in resilience.

    Resources

    Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Analysis Handbook and e-LearningsOpens in a new tab
    The CVCA Handbook and associated training guides practitioners in analsing vulnerability to climate change and adaptive capacity at the community level.

    Short Course
    CVCA #1 – The Basics of Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Analysis
    CVCA #2: The CVCA Step-by-Step

    Climate, Environment and Disaster Risk Reduction Integration Guidance (CEDRIG)Opens in a new tab
    This portal has tools which can assess if existing and planned strategies, programs and projects are at risk from climate change, environmental degradation and natural hazards, as well as whether these interventions could further exacerbate GHG emissions, environmental degradation or risks of natural hazards. includes tools for rapid assessment, analysis of strategies and programs and detailed analysis of projects.
    Gender-sensitive Climate Vulnerability and Capacity AnalysisOpens in a new tab
    In this course, you will learn more about key aspects of climate vulnerability, differentiate between the capacities, needs and priorities of women and men in relation to climate vulnerability, as well as learn about participatory approaches, and the tools for implementing at the community level.
    Participatory Capacity and Vulnerability Analysis (PCVA): A Practitioner GuideOpens in a new tab
    This guide is aimed at development practitioners working with communities that are vulnerable to natural hazards. In Part 1, the theory and concepts behind PCVA are outlined, as well as a brief description of how it has evolved and why climate change must be a significant factor in any risk reduction programming. Part 2 provides the step-by-step guide to the seven stages of the PCVA process. It covers the preparatory work you need to undertake, facilitation (working directly with the community on participatory learning and action (PLA) exercises to answer key questions), and action planning.
    CEDRA: Climate Change and Environmental Degradation Risk and Adaptation AssessmentOpens in a new tab
    Project assessment and decision support tool to help organisations integrate adaptation into development and disaster risk reduction (DRR) work, moving towards an approach which sees projects intentionally designed to ensure that development, adaptation to climate and environmental change and resilience to disasters are addressed together.
    Australian Humanitarian Partnership (AHP) and Disaster Ready ProgramOpens in a new tab
    AHP Disaster READY demonstrates multiple enablers of best practices for climate change integration, particularly those focused on partnerships and local leadership. 
    Community Led Adaptation Pathways in Solomon Islands ProjectOpens in a new tab
    Community-led Adaptation Pathways in Solomon Islands Project is an example of a community-led adaptation project, which recognised diverse community perspectives and strengths. 
    Shifting the Power CoalitionOpens in a new tab
    Shifting the Power Coalition is an example of a regional coalition of feminist civil society organisations coming together to champion women’s leadership and presenting an amplified voice on humanitarian response and climate resilience
    Climate resilience video playlistOpens in a new tab
    A playlist of short animated videos introducing climate resilience infrastructure and climate resilience health systems.
    Women's Weather Watch (Women Wetum Weta, WWW), VanuatuOpens in a new tab
    Women’s Weather Watch is an example of local women’s leadership for effective community resilience building. This case study links to the ‘Operational’ level of ACFID’s Climate Action Framework.
    UNFCCC Climate Action Pathway: Resilience, Action TableOpens a PDF in a new tab
    A detailed framework of interventions across five thematic impact areas: resilient food and agriculture systems, resilient water and natural ecosystems, resilient cities, resilient coastal zones and oceans, and resilient infrastructure and services.
    Adapting to a Changing ClimateOpens a PDF in a new tab
    An overview of the principles and importance of Climate Change Adaptation from United Nations Climate Change
    Care Toolkit for Integrating Climate Change Adaptation into Development ProjectsOpens a PDF in a new tab
    This Toolkit offers practical, “how to” guidance for integrating climate change adaptation into the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of development projects
    Beyond Barriers: Integrating disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in the PacificOpens a PDF in a new tab

    This paper seeks to identify the barriers to and opportunities for enhanced DRR and CCA implementation. It examines why efforts to integrate CCA and DRR should start from perspectives and implications at the community level, and explores the challenges and opportunities in doing so.

    Bridging Localisation and Climate Adaptation Pathways: Case Studies from Asia, The Middle East and Africa
    This study explores the interaction between, and mutual complementarity of, locally led climate adaptation and humanitarian localisation to support climate, humanitarian and development actors, policymakers and funders to consider how to more closely align these approaches and produce better outcomes for at-risk communities.
    Planning for Resilience: A Practitioner's ManualOpens a PDF in a new tab
    The guide provides step-by-step instructions for community-based adaptation planning, tools for implementation and extra resources to integrate CCAR into programming.
    Adaptation Toolkit: Integrating Adaptation to Climate Change into Secure LivelihoodsOpens a PDF in a new tab
    A toolkit designed to support the integration of climate change and disasters into livelihoods work
    Climate Witness: Community ToolkitOpens a PDF in a new tab
    The toolkit is primarily a participatory technique to document local impacts of climate change and to devise appropriate adaptation measures that local communities can implement themselves.
    Climate change action through civil society programs: Part 2Opens a PDF in a new tab
    This report presents findings from the second phase of an activity exploring the integration of climate change and disaster resilience into civil society programs. The activity involved the peer-review of guidance documents by five Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) to understand the effectiveness of guidance to integrating climate and disaster resilience actions in Pacific CSO programming.
    How can development programs better scale-up Climate Smart Agricutulture? Lessons from Asia and Pacific
    This panel session from ACFID Conference 2022 probes the following questions:
     • What are the opportunities and challenges that CSA offers in promoting more inclusive, efficient and ‘greener’ agri-food systems?
    • How can we ensure the right incentives for agri-food system actors to promote climate-smart business models that scale-up CSA, while empowering smallholders and poor households, especially women?
    • What is the role of NGOs in this development space in relation to other actors?
    Empowering local actors to increase the climate resilience of WASH services
    The presentation from ACFID Conference 2022 discusses practical approaches to encourage cross-sectoral dialogue between the WASH and Water Resource Management sectors, increasing gender and social inclusion, as well as approaches to strengthen climate and water resources data management.
    Gender transformative climate change action in the PacificOpens a PDF in a new tab
    This framework and guidance tool aims to motivate positive practice for gender transformative programming in the Pacific
    Considerations to Integrate Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation into Health System Strengthening ProgrammingOpens a PDF in a new tab
    USAID Guidance Document for considerations in integrating climate adaptation into health system programming
    Climate change response for inclusive WASH: A guidance note for WaterAid Timor LesteOpens a PDF in a new tab
    This Guidance Note provides activities and recommendations to WaterAid Timor-Leste for integrating considerations of climate change into its existing inclusive rural water service programming.

    Return to Main Menu


  • Nature Based Solutions

    Nature-based solutions are environmental restoration responses at the programmatic level. The objective of nature based solutions is to address the causes and reduce the impact of climate change by protecting and restoring ecosystems that support human life, while preserving biodiversity.


    Principles

    The implementation of nature-based solutions should be evidence-based. They should be informed by credible environmental assessments and climate change data, and ensure that solutions are appropriate for the local community and environment.

    The implementation of nature-based solutions should be equitable. They should consider potential social, economic, and environmental impacts and how different groups use and access local space and the natural environment.

    The implementation of nature-based solutions should be inclusive. They should engage local communities and, where possible, be locally led, including the identification, design, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation of actions.

    Actions

    Common types of natured based solutions include:

    • Ecosystem restoration approaches: ecological restoration, ecological engineering, forest landscape restoration.
    • Issue-specific ecosystem-related approaches: ecosystem-based adaptation, ecosystem-based mitigation, climate change adaptation services, ecosystem-based disaster risk reduction.
    • Infrastructure-related approaches: natural infrastructure, green infrastructure.
    • Ecosystem-based management approaches: integrated coastal zone management, integrated water resources management.
    • Ecosystem protection approaches: area-based conservation approaches, including protected area management.

    Resources

    IUCN Global Standard for Nature-based SolutionsOpens in a new tab
    This user-friendly framework for the verification, design, and scaling up of Nature-based solutions consists of 8 criteria and 28 indicators.
    IUCN Nature-based Solutions for People and PlanetOpens in a new tab
    Information, resources and news from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).
    Community-Led Adaptation Pathways in Solomon Islands ProjectOpens in a new tab
    Community-led Adaptation Pathways in Solomon Islands Project is an example of a community-led adaptation project, which recognised diverse community perspectives and strengths.
    Papua New Guinea Livelihoods Project - Mangoro Market MeriOpens in a new tab
    The Mangoro Market Meri livelihoods project in PNG provides an example of how an INGO, The Nature Conservancy, can work with a local NGO to act as knowledge brokers between communities and scientists. 
    Farmer Managed Natural RegenerationOpens in a new tab
    A hub of resources and information dedicated to Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) including links in a range of languages to the comprehensive FMNR manual (https://fmnrhub.com.au/fmnr-manual/)
    Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration eWorkshop in a new tab
    An online course from the World Vision Technical Academy on facilitating FMNR implementation in the community.
    Nature-based Solutions for ClimateOpens in a new tab
    WWF hub with information, videos and links to resources and reports on Nature-based solutions
    Nature-based Solutions UNDP DatabaseOpens in a new tab
    A database with case studies and examples of UNDP projects demonstrating how local communities and indigenous peoples are achieveing the SDGs thorugh nature-based actions.
    Nature-based solutions for climateOpens in a new tab
    DCCEEW's (Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water) site on nature-based solutions
    A Little Less Conversation: Nature Based SolutionsOpens in a new tab
    For episode 5 of A Little Less Conversation, we speak with ActionAid Vanuatu Country Manager Flora Vano, and WWF Australia’s Head of Social Development, Nat Burke. Nature based solutions present an effective way to handle the impact of climate change, such as planting mangroves or regenerating coral reefs.
    Eco toolkitOpens in a new tab
    The tool aims to raise awareness in climaet change & DRR space within Christian community; useful videos and faith-based resources for information dissemination .
    The Road to RestorationOpens in a new tab
    The guide describes how to develop a restoration monitoring system and what would be the priority considerations for local practitioners in developing the monitoring system
    Community organising toolkit on ecosystem restoration in a new tab
    This toolkit is designed to provide support to individuals, communities, or CSOs to restore the ecosystem by equipping with necessary tools, knowledge, and resources. The toolkit comprises flowcharts on how to take action, exercise guide on local restoration, community strength and constraints mapping tools, action mapping, and suggests knowledge sharing approaches, to integrate environmental restoration within the community. 
    A toolkit to support conservation by indigenous people and local communities in a new tab
    The toolkit provides a reminder that the achievement of the emerging post-2015 sustainable development goals (SDGs) will need to be linked to a comprehensive valuation of ecosystem services, and be spearheaded by local CSOs.

    Return to Main Menu


  • Low Carbon Development

    Low carbon development is a mitigation response at the programmatic level. The objective of low carbon development is to support the delivery of sustainable development outcomes through the utilisation of clean technology and the development of long-term low emissions development strategies.


    Principles

    Low carbon development actions should be evidence-based. They should be informed by credible analysis of emissions or other pollution from target activities. They should also be based on credible research or proven technology and actions.

    Low carbon development actions should be equitable.They should ensure that the benefits of low carbon development solutions are shared across different groups; they should consider potential social, economic and environmental impacts on different groups; and they should consider opportunities to promote the social and economic inclusion of marginalised groups.

    Low carbon development actions should be inclusive.They should engage local communities and, where possible, be locally led including the identification, design, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation of actions.

    Actions

    Key steps in preparing a low-emission climate-resilient development strategy are:

    • Developing a multi-stakeholder planning process.
    • Preparing climate change profiles and vulnerability scenarios.
    • Identifying strategic options leading to more equitable low-emission climate-resilient development trajectories.
    • Identifying policies and financing options to implement priority climate change options.
    • Preparing a low-emission climate-resilient development roadmap.

    Resources

    Loru Forest Carbon Project in a new tab
    This case study focuses on a forest-based carbon credit project in Vanuatu supported by Live & Learn and the Nakau Programme in partnership with the local Indigenous community.
    Preparing Low-Emission Climate-Resilient  Development Strategies in a new tab
    This guidebook is intended to enable project managers, UNDP Country Offices, and developing country government decision makers to acquaint themselves with a variety of methodologies most appropriate to their development contexts in support of the preparation of LECRDS.

    Return to Main Menu


  • Climate Advocacy General Resources

    These resources are about advocacy and climate advocacy in general, and can be applied to all three of the Policy and Advocacy Level Climate Actions.


    Resources

    UNCC: Introduction to Sustainable Development in PracticeDownloads a Word document
    This e-learning focuses the rationale, drivers, challenges, and opportunities for an integrated approach to tackling poverty-environment issues at the international, national and sub-national levels.
    UNCC: Advancing Sustainable Development in PracticeDownloads a Word document
    This course teaches learners how to apply in practice an integrated approach to sustainable development throughout the various stages of the policy and project cycle, including analysis, dialogue, planning, financing, communicating, monitoring, and evaluation. The course contains tools, tips, and methods for applying sustainable development in practice.
    What does good Climate Policy look like? Downloads a Word document
    This article highlights key considerations when considering climate policy announcements.
    Ideas for Climate AdvocacyDownloads a Word document
    This resource provides foundational understanding of both climate justice and advocacy; summaries of scientific findings on the climate crisis, and examples of climate advocacy in action. 
    ACT Alliance Advocacy Academy - Climate JusticeDownloads a Word document
    An e-learning developed by the ACT Alliance that supports organisations in their climate advocacy - including topics of climate science, climate justice, advocacy targets, solutions and a resource library. The general Advocacy module outlines how advocacy works in pracitce and steps in planning your advocacy.
    A Little Less Conversation: Climate GovernanceDownloads a Word document
    Climate change could be a political football, easily booted from agency to agency, if there was no true will to progress the agenda. It is true that climate falls under the remit of a number of government agencies – but thankfully, there is the will to ensure it is divided up carefully and with thought. Howard Bamsey, who has spent much of his career as a diplomat and in climate change, joins the podcast to tell Rachel and Dermot all about the architecture of climate governance.
    Advocacy Tools and Guidelines: Promoting Policy ChangeDownloads a Word document
    Tools and guidelines to help program managers with the skills to become effective advocates.
    Leading development agencies welcome early agreement on the Loss and Damage Fund announced at COP28Downloads a Word document
    Oxfam Australia, The Climate Action Network Australia, ActionAid Australia, Caritas Australia and Edmund Rice Centre for Justice and Community Education have welcomed the landmark announcement of the establishment of the Loss and Damage Fund at COP28, and call on Australia to make an initial $100 million pledge to the Fund.
    A Little Less Conversation: Loss and DamageDownloads a Word document
    Loss and damage has quickly emerged as a key theme of COP28, with the news ahead of the summit that rich countries would set up a loss and damage fund, as promised last year. So what is loss and damage, and how has it become the latest frontier in the fight against climate change? Two loss and damage experts join us on this episode to explain more: Julie-Ann Richards, who is the strategy lead for the Loss and Damage Coalition; and Dr Melanie Pill, with the Lowy Institute.
    Climate Justice - Loss and DamageDownloads a Word document
    Some short videos explaining where Loss and Damage sits in the spectrum of Climate Action
    7-Step Advocacy PlanDownloads a Word document
    A brief guide from YWCA on how to approach advocacy
    Advocacy Toolkit for joint action on climate change, the environment and health.Downloads a Word document
    A toolkit for health leaders, health workers and the public in the Pacific to advocateabout the health impacts of climate and environmental change.
    Analysis of Australia's Development PolicyDownloads a Word document
    ACFID's overview and analysis of Australia's New Development Policy - Page 11 focused on Climate Change
    ACFID's Submission to the New Development Policy on Climate ChangeDownloads a Word document
    ACFID's submission on Australia's New International Development Policy. Pages 14-16 on Climate Change
    National Advocacy ToolkitDownloads a Word document
    The toolkit aims to guide CSOs to work together to plan and undertake an advocacy initiative around resilience issues within their countries and provides simple tools, approaches and tips for the process.
    Engaging with the Green Climate Fund_CSO ToolkitDownloads a Word document
    This toolkit aims to provide civil society actors and their organisations, as well as any other stakeholders interested in the GCF, with relevant information, knowledge, and guidance on how to get involved with the fund.

    Return to Main Menu

  • Increasing Adaptation Assistance

    Increasing adaptation assistance is an adaptation response at the policy and advocacy level. The objective is to effect global and regional policies and treaties to support countries, communities and individuals.


    Principles

    Adaptation policy and advocacy initiatives should be evidence-based. They should be informed by and offer credible research and analysis. Where possible, they should be supported by ANGOs’ experiences and firsthand evidence collected from development and humanitarian programs.

    Adaptation policy and advocacy initiatives should be equitable. They should seek to ensure that global efforts to adapt to climate change prioritise and account for the differentiated needs of groups most vulnerable to climate change impacts.

    Adaptation policy and advocacy initiatives should be inclusive. They should include the voices of people and communities most affected by climate change. Where possible, they should be led by local communities.

    Actions

    Key advocacy issues for increasing adaptation assistance include:

    • Increasing the amount of adaptation funding or finance that is available to countries most at risk of climate change impacts.
    • Ensuring climate change finance mechanisms support priority access for thos most affected by climate change.
    • Ensuring climate finance mechanisms (especially market-based mechanisms) include safeguards for human rights.
    • Urgent, scaled-up, new and additional finance for addressing loss and damage.
    • Enhanced institutional arrangements fo facilitating action and support to address loss and damage.
    • Advancing climate justice in international law.
    • Ensuring climate policy and programs are centred in climate justice and equity principles.
    • Working in solidarity with communities to support climate justice.

    Resources

    Shifting the Power CoalitionDownloads a Word document
    Shifting the Power Coalition is an example of a regional coalition of feminist civil society organisations coming together to champion women’s leadership and presenting an amplified voice on humanitarian response and climate resilience
    UNEP Adaptation Gap ReportDownloads a Word document
    This report identifies seven ways to increase financing, including through domestic expenditure and international and private sector finance. Additional avenues include remittances, increasing and tailoring finance to Small and Medium Enterprises and a reform of the global financial architecture. 
    Taking a gender sensitive approach to climate change prevention, mitigation and adaptationDownloads a Word document
    Policy position paper on climate change by the International Women’s Development Agency (IWDA).
    A Little Less Conversation: Adaptation and MitigationDownloads a Word document
    Adaptation and mitigation are two terms commonly used in connection with how to approach responses to climate change: do we spend our energies trying to address the root causes of climate change, or do we work on strategies to help us adapt? In this episode, Sala George Carter of the Australian National University and climate change activist Lisa Viliamu Jameson join us to discuss the twin approaches.
    Falling Short: Australia's Role in Funding Fairer Climate Action in a Warming WorldDownloads a Word document
    In Falling Short: Australia’s role in funding fairer climate action in a warming world, an alliance led by Oxfam Australia and ActionAid Australia has called for the Australia Government to increase its ambition on climate finance, emphasising progressive climate action as vital if Australia is to fulfill its duty as a wealthy country and major polluter. This includes supporting a Pacific Islands proposal for a standalone finance arm to address loss and damage.
    Revitalising the Green Climate FundDownloads a Word document
    This policy brief argues that the Green Climate Fund has a unique role to play in the global climate finance landscape. Several key reforms will, however, be necessary if the GCF is to deliver on its full potential and justify a scale-up in its activities.
    Halftime at COP28: Reflections from DubaiDownloads a Word document
    An article about how a global Loss and Damage fund should be structured.
    Oxfam response to Australia climate finance announcementDownloads a Word document
    A media release from OXFAM Australia in response to the announcement that Australia will lift its cliamte finance spend from $2billion to $3 billion.
    The future is a choice: The Oxfam Framework and Guidance for Resilient DevelopmentDownloads a Word document
    This document ncludes descriptions of 'Pathways to resilient development outcomes' inclusive of: working collaboratively; understanding risk, fragility and vulnerability; designing for the long term and ongoing adaptive management

    Return to Main Menu

  • Increasing Environmental Protection and Restoration


    Increasing environmental protection and restoration is an environmental restoration response at the policy and advocacy level. The objective is to elevate and integrate environmental protection and restoration as a key pillar of sustainable development policy and practice, and to increase global and national efforts to stop and reverse destruction, degradation and fragmentation of all types of ecosystems.


    Principles

    Environmental policy and advocacy initiatives should be evidence-based. They should be informed by, and offer, credible research and analysis on international environmental and biodiversity agreements. They should be supported, where possible, by ANGOs’ experiences and firsthand evidence of the impact of environmental degradation on local communities.

    Environmental policy and advocacy initiatives should be equitable. They should seek to ensure the protection and restoration of critical ecosystems and natural assets for all communities around the world.

    Environmental policy and advocacy initiatives should be inclusive. They should include the voices of people and communities most affected by environmental degradation and climate change. Where possible, they should be led by local communities and indigenous knowledge and practices.

    Actions

    Key advocacy issues for increasing environmental protection and restoration include:

    • Addressing the drivers of deforestation and habitat fragmentation such as palm oil and timber plantations, cattle, mining, road construction and urban sprawl.
    • Prioritising nature based solutions, including by incentivising the delivery of environmental benefit through elevating the environment (and climate change adaptation) as a core investment in the development policy.
    • Stopping the overfishing of the oceans by prohibiting certain fishing practice to prevent bycatch, and enforcing international agreements.
    • Addressing desertification and land degradation.
    • Preventing pollution from destroying local ecosystems, including by regulating industrial and mining by-products, improving general waste management and recycling systems, and banning single-use plastics.

    Resources

    World Vision International Policy Brief: COVID-19 and Green RecoveryOpens in a new tab
    A brief focusing on the links between the pandemic, the destruction of the natural environment, and calls for systematic change.
    Better Futures Australia
    The Better Futures Australia initiative is part of a global action supported by Climate Action Network Australia.The site contains campaigns that you can join and ideas to champion climate action.
    Micah Australia: Climate ChangeOpens in a new tab
    A site with information about climate justice.
    Climate, Environment and Disaster Risk Reduction Integration Guidance (CEDRIG)Opens in a new tab
    Information about Action Aid's Pacific Young Women Responding to Climate Change project which provides Pacific young women with training and opportunities to access climate change science services; and to engage in the local and national disaster and climate change policy conversation.

    Return to Main Menu

  • Global Emissions Reduction

    Global emissions reduction is a mitigation response at the policy and advocacy level. The objective of global emissions reduction advocacy is to accelerate national and global action to reduce emissions and keep global warming to well below 2°C.


    Principles

    Mitigation policy and advocacy initiatives should be evidence-based. They should be informed by the latest climate science, credible research and analysis, and international agreements. They should offer proven technology and action.

    Mitigation policy and advocacy initiatives should be equitable.They should ensure that industrialised nations take responsibility for their fair share of global emissions reductions and do not shift responsibility to developing countries.

    Mitigation policy and advocacy initiatives should be inclusive.They should includemake space for, and prioritise the voices of people and communities most affected by climate change, and where possible be led by local communities.

    Actions

    Key advocacy issues for global emissions reduction include:

    • Setting more ambitious emissions reduction targets in line with or better than the Paris Agreement.
    • Ending subsidies that sustain fossil fuel industries.
    • Banning all fossil fuel exports from Australia.
    • Increasing Australian assistance to development partners countries to transition to a low carbon economy.
    • Ensuring emissions offsetting is not used to avoid making real reductions in emissions and is only used where there are presently no viable alternative options to reduce emissions.
    • Ensuring any emissions offsets safeguard biodiversity, human rights and local community knowledge and rights.

    Resources

    Climate Action TrackerDownloads a Word document
    The Climate Action Tracker is an independent scientific project that tracks government climate action and measures it against the globally agreed Paris Agreement aim of "holding warming well below 2°C, and pursuing efforts to limit warming to 1.5°C." 
    ACFID Connect: Climate COP 101
    This ACFID Connect event includes members sharing about the basics of the international climate negotiations that happen at the annual UN climate change conferences, "COPs" (Conference of the Parties), and how NGOs can engage. What happens at a COP? Who is there? What does it mean for climate action? How do NGOs engage? What can we expect from COP28 this year?
    A Little Less Conversation: Adaptation and MitigationDownloads a Word document

    Adaptation and mitigation are two terms commonly used in connection with how to approach responses to climate change: do we spend our energies trying to address the root causes of climate change, or do we work on strategies to help us adapt? In this episode, Sala George Carter of the Australian National University and climate change activist Lisa Viliamu Jameson join us to discuss the twin approaches.

    OXFAM Australia's Advocacy on a Just TransitionDownloads a Word document
    This case study describes Oxfam Australia’s approach to advocacy for a ‘just energy transition’ contributing to emissions reduction and low carbon development
    Submission to the Inquiry into the Climate Change Amendment (Duty of Care and Intergenerational Climate Equity) Bill 2023Downloads a Word document
    An example of an advocacy message to the Australian Government  - submission from the Australia Insitute to the Inquiry into the Climate Change Amendment (Duty of Care and Intergenerational Climate Equity) Bill 2023
    Climate of the Nation 2023Downloads a Word document
    The Australia Institute’s annual Climate of the Nation report provides a comprehensive account of Australian attitudes towards climate change, its causes and impacts, and the integrity of Australia’s current and proposed climate solutions. 
    Causes of Global WarmingDownloads a Word document
    Foundational information about the causes of climate change with options for readers to join campaigns.
    Calculate Your FootprintDownloads a Word document
    A tool for the public to calculate their ecological footprint
    Write to the Climate MinisterDownloads a Word document
    A site to assist you to write and send an email to Climate Change Minister asking for a new climate target of Net Zero by 2035.
    Updated assessment of Australia's emission reduction targets and 1.5 degree pathways.Downloads a Word document
    This briefing note provides an update to Climate Resource’s assessment of Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions budget:

    Return to Main Menu